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How Many Ounces Is One Serving of Wine?

How Many Ounces Is One Serving of Wine?

July 05, 2020 / Patrick Zavorskas

I will say here and I will say it again - I love wine. 

I will not be guilty in saying that every now and then, I enjoy drinking a glass of wine. For me, it sometimes acts as a simple comfort after a long stressful day; but most of the time, it serves as the perfect accompaniment to a home-cooked meal I had made myself for dinner. On most occasions, I will be honest in saying that I don't tend to measure how much I pour. In some nights, I fill the cup a little more than probably needed and definitely more than one serving of wine, but don't we all. However, with this said, I am going to fill you in on a little secret:

If you’re like me and are accustomed to coming home at night for a little self-care, whipping out that wine glass that you truly love more than your best-friend, and filling it up to the brim with your favorite Pinot or Riesling,  you will probably be extremely disappointed with what I am about to tell you. The next time you order some vino at a bar or restaurant, you definitely are not going to get as much as you expect to get. Want to know why - well the answer is that a typical serving on wine (though we’d all like to believe otherwise) isn’t as large as we expect it to be. In fact, one serving of wine contains only 5 ounces This said, depending on the type of glass you’re using, that can look really small. 

Are We Over-pouring Ourselves On Wine - Probably, But Did You Ever Think Why?

Over-pouring is a problem that is especially common if your favorite wine glass is a large one. When looking at it, when simply pouring the 5 ounces that are usually found in one serving, it might barely make up 1/4 of the glass. And what happens if the glass is different than a typical wine glass? Is there a legitimate reason has to why different sizes are needed for different types of wine? Why is there so many rules when it comes to a red-glass or a white-glass? Well,  according to sommelier Victoria James, wine director at New York restaurant Piora, wine glasses come in many shapes and sizes for a reason. Different glasses are designed to accentuate the different flavors and aromas of the different wines that exist within our world.

For example, James suggests that a flute is good for Champagne because it keeps the bubbles in the glass for longer. On the contrary, the larger, more open rim on a standard wine glass will allow you to, “get your nose in and appreciate the complex aromatics," often found in many classic white or red wines. However, aside from that flute, the majority of these glasses can accommodate a lot more than a single 5-ounce serving. This is where things can tend to get tricky in the over-pouring department.

What Can We Do

As I had said, a glass of wine with dinner can be a great way to unwind at the end of a stressful day. Too many glasses, on the other hand, can actually mess with your sleep, and stack on the calories, which can get in the way of any weight loss goals you may have. One serving of wine, whether it be red, white, rose, or bubbly, will have between 105 and 125 calories. With that said if you’re over-pouring, those calories can add up quickly. If you’re actually interested in paring down your pour of wine, there are a couple things you should know. In a standard 750-mL bottle of wine, there are roughly five glasses of wine. This means that with each serving, you’ll want to aim to pour yourself one-fifth of the bottle.

If you are curious what one serving of wine looks like in different glasses, there are many visual representations to help you out! At the need of the day, however, if you are a little over or under, it will not affect your body that horribly. Wine is meant to be enjoyed, so don't sweat if it happens occasionally! As always, drink responsibly.

Share with us your favorite wine by tagging us on Instagram @itouchwearables and Facebook @itouchwearables. Also, be sure to check out our new articles published daily!

-Patrick


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